Friday, May 30, 2008

Condiments/Appetizers: Ginamos/Bagoong/Uyap/Salted Small Shrimps/Fish


Yup, it's Ginamos as what Bisayan people call it. Hubby calls it rotten fish cos it smells like one. Actually it is salted small fish that has kept for days, not in the fridge but somewhere it is safe to keep. The longer it is kept, the better it tastes ;) I love eating it with rice, cooked or ripe banana (Tondan or Lakatan), sweet corn and raw mango. You have to add vinegar or lemon so it will not be too salty. I like adding chili on it mmmmm yummy! Thinking of it makes me drool!


Ginamos (Salted Small Fish)

Mary's Vinegar with spices

Apple Mangoes

Sweet Corn, Bananas and Ginamos


I miss eating the native magoes we have in Philippines, the sour ones. It's best with Ginamos and Bagoong. Bagoong is the tagalog word for Uyap. It is called salted small shrimp in english. It is pink in color but dark brown when cooked. Like ginamos, it tastes good too with mango and rice. I haven't tried that with corn or bananas. Just with mango and rice.

Mango and Uyap (Salted Small Shrimps)

Visit your favorite Filipino stores in your area. Check if they sell these. :)

Additional Info:

National Pride of the Philippines.

Mud colored (sometimes in outrageous pink or whathaveyou), funny & strong smelling, and a famous Filipino concoction, this is...Bagoong Terong or simply bagoong, and bugguong in the Ilocano language, is a common ingredient used in the Philippines and particularly in Northern Ilocano Cuisine. It is made by salting and fermenting the bonnet mouth fish. This bagoong is coarser than Bagoong Monamon, and contains fragments of the salted and fermented fish; however, they are similar in flavor. To the opinion of many Westerners who are unfamiliar with this condiment, the smell can be extremely repulsive. Bagoong is however an essential ingredient in many curries and sauces. The odor is distinct and unique.

Fish sauce, common throughout Southeast Asian cuisine, is a by-product of the bagoong process. Known in the Philippines as patis, it is distinguished as the clear refined layer floating on the thicker bagoong. Patis and bagoong can be interchanged in recipes, depending on personal taste and preference.Bagoong is used as a flavor enhancing agent in the place of salt, soy sauce, or monosodium glutamate (MSG). It is used to make a fish stock, the base of many Ilocano dishes, such as pinakbet, dinengdeng, inabraw; or as a dressing for cold steamed greens in the dish kinilnat (ensalada), like ferns, bitter melon leaves, or sweet potato leaves. Bagoong is also used as a condiment, or dipping sauce, for chicharon, whole fried fish, green and ripe mangoes, or hard boiled eggs.It is similar in taste and odor to anchovy paste. -- Wikipedia

5 comments:

The Adventurer said...

Fel, tulo-tulo man sad ako laway ani imo blog uy! heheheh!

sotes said...

Order ka Ginamos? Just text us! We deliver! Hehe! :)

http://anahawnons.blogspot.com/2010/11/ginamos-for-sale.html

anahawnons said...

Pastilan kalami ba ani! :) How do you get ginamos there in the US? Do you make it? or Someone send it to you from the Philippines?

April Mcgregor said...

Hi felicity! Just happen to see your blog while I'm searching as to where I can get ginamos here in the States. I love your blog and just made me crave ffor ginamos more...
If you know where I can get one please let me know.

Preggy April :)

Anonymous said...

Hi felicity! Just happen to see your blog while I'm searching as to where I can get ginamos here in the States. I love your blog and just made me crave ffor ginamos more...
If you know where I can get one please let me know.

Preggy April :)